Raptor 350 General Information, Tips & Tricks - Page 3 - Yamaha Raptor Forum
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Old 10-30-2015, 04:18 AM Thread Starter
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Raptor 350 Headlight/Headlamp Bulb Information from Yamaha Owners and Service Manual

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Refer to prior post in this thread for more details on headlight bulbs. This is just a quick note.

Man. NO place carries H6 headlight bulbs. It seems they are very specialized bulbs. May have to modify another style bulb by taking off the mounting ring. But then there's the odd back two connectors that are elongated. I would like to upgrade the front headlight bulbs to a low energy high output LED cluster bulb. I would like to reduce running power requirements so the battery gets the full stator energy as I like running with headlights ON during the day.
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Old 10-30-2015, 05:45 AM Thread Starter
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Raptor 350 Model Number and Warrior Model Number and Model Number Variants from Yamaha Owners and Service Manual

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Here's a general overview of understanding Yamaha Raptor 350 model numbers and Warrior since the Raptor 350 TOOK over the Warrior 350 and many of the parts are the same (drivetrain not plastics) and the Warrior service manual is used on the Raptor 350.

1987 - 2004 Warrior 350 model = YFM350X (X=Warrior)
2005 - 2013 Raptor 350 model = YFM350RXR(C) (R=Raptor?)
2005 - 2013 Raptor 350 model = YFM350S?
2005 - 2013 Raptor 350 model = YFM350XP?
2005 - 2013 Raptor 350 model = YFM350XJ?

Warrior and Raptor History (why is this important, heck I dont know but heeere we go!)
==================

When it was first produced, the Yamaha 350 Warrior set the bar for all-terrain vehicles (ATVs). The Warrior ATV was in production for 17 years and received praise for its efficient, fun and user-friendly design. In 1987, Yamaha introduced the 350 Warrior. In 2004, that model was discontinued, and Yamaha introduced the 350 Raptor ATV in 2005 in order to improve the sport performance of the line.

The Warrior was equipped for strong, midrange pulling capabilities and was fitted with a snorkel to allow it to travel through water and mud. Its basic design, however, stayed relatively untouched: a six-speed transmission with a 350 cc, four-stroke engine, hydraulic disc brakes and long travel suspension.

In 1987, when the Warrior was introduced, it was the first-ever electric-start ATV. Over the years, the Warrior developed a cultlike following as it became the world's all-time top-selling sport ATV.

2004 was the last year Warrior 350 and 2005 was the first year Raptor 350. Plastics from the Warrior changed to the Raptor for a more sport look and the drivetrain stayed mostly the same. This is an important note to remember.

ATTACHED are images. First is the model number I mentioned before being one of many listed for Raptor 350s. Note the XR(C) at the end. Second pic is the WARRIOR -SERVICE MANUAL- and it works for the Raptor 350 but the Warrior model ends in the 'X'. I mention this again because you may see several EXTRA letters at the end of the 'YFM350'.

Finally the third is MORE LETTERS! Fun huh. Anyone knows what they all mean feel free to post.

EDITED: Just found another model number YFM350S.
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Last edited by sharpraptor; 10-30-2015 at 06:46 AM.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:15 AM Thread Starter
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Raptor 350 Carburetor Information, Jets, Cleaning and Rebuild Information from Yamaha Owners and Service Manual

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I could easily go into pages and pages of Carburetor how-tos and endless paragraphs. Carburetors are simple yet complex and they are affected by
many factors such as ambient temperature, altitude, fuel supply, condensation and a million other things. The best advice I can generally give
is to understand on a basic level how Carburetors work and get your Carburetor to FACTORY SPECS before attempting anything, that is IF your
RAPTOR IS COMPLETELY STOCK and the exhaust and intake have not been modified. Nothing sucks more than trying to get a Raptor running right only
to find someone messed up the Carburetor jet or float or 'ported' something in the carb to get more power and it may NEVER RUN right after. Get
a BASELINE FIRST of the carb running right THEN make changes and you can always revert BACK to FACTORY if you cannot get the carb to run right
after changing something.

I will break down the Carburetor into several sections;

1. Know how Carburetors operate in a basic level.
2. Know what your Raptor Carburetor is, how it works and the parts inside.
3. How to disassemble the Raptor and get to the carb to clean it and how to determine if you need to rebuild the carb when cleaning wont work.

=======================

1. Know how Carburetors operate in a basic level.

Go on youtube and lookup ATV Carburetor videos. Theres alot out there but they all are basic and have similar things inside. Make sure you can
understand how fuel gets into the carb, how its metered into the carb that is, and what the float and and float bowl does, what each one of the
JETS INSIDE do and why there's different sizes.

2. Know what your Raptor Carburetor is, how it works and the parts inside.

SPECIAL NOTE: There is some confusion on what the internal jets and screws and parts inside the Carburetor are. Some call them 'jets' and some
call them 'pilots' and some call them 'jet needles' or just 'needles'. I CANNOT go into what means what just be aware you need to look at how
Yamaha calls them and use that as the reference. Mostly I MATCH the SIZE as each JET is different size.

- Raptor 350s have a BSR36 Carburetor made by Mikuni and sold to Yamaha.
- The Factory MAIN Jet is a #142.5.
- The Factory Pilot Jet is #22.5
- Pilot Fuel Screw Factory is Set 2.25 or 2 and 1/4 turns out from bottom
- Starter Jet #70
- Fuel Level in Bowl is 4-5MM above the float chamber mating surface (this matters if youre engine is being starved for fuel on acceleration)
- Float hight is 13mm (same reason as before)
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Last edited by sharpraptor; 10-30-2015 at 06:47 AM.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:25 AM Thread Starter
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Raptor 350 Carburetor Information, Jets, Cleaning and Rebuild Information from Yamaha Owners and Service Manual

==================================================

Part Two, Part One is in the prior post above.

(I will repeat this again from the first post)

I could easily go into pages and pages of Carburetor how-tos and endless paragraphs. Carburetors are simple yet complex and they are affected by
many factors such as ambient temperature, altitude, fuel supply, condensation and a million other things. The best advice I can generally give
is to understand on a basic level how Carburetors work and get your Carburetor to FACTORY SPECS before attempting anything, that is IF your
RAPTOR IS COMPLETELY STOCK and the exhaust and intake have not been modified. Nothing sucks more than trying to get a Raptor running right only
to find someone messed up the Carburetor jet or float or 'ported' something in the carb to get more power and it may NEVER RUN right after. Get
a BASELINE FIRST of the carb running right THEN make changes and you can always revert BACK to FACTORY if you cannot get the carb to run right
after changing something.

I will break down the Carburetor into several sections;

1. Know how Carburetors operate in a basic level.
2. Know what your Raptor Carburetor is, how it works and the parts inside.
3. How to disassemble the Raptor and get to the carb to clean it and how to determine if you need to rebuild the carb when cleaning wont work.

=======================
1. Covered in previous post
2. Covered in previous post
3. How to disassemble the Raptor and get to the carb to clean it and how to determine if you need to rebuild the carb when cleaning wont work.

a. I have looked and there really isnt step by step instructions on how to rebuild a Raptor 350 carb or a video. There are some warrior steps and videos but I havent been able to find them. Also, even my carb rebuild kit for my raptor 350 didnt come with instructions. So yeah. Basically, I located each seperate item in my rebuild kit, once I opened the carb float bowl up, and replaced each part being VERY careful not to strip anything or break anything or force anything. Its a carb, not a prom date, dont force it to do something it doesnt want to do.

b. I used these carb rebuild guides with the first being the SAME carb in the Raptor 350s and its great.

http://www.off-road.com/atv/tech/atv...nup-52101.html

This one is more of a general guide but has good information:
http://hubpages.com/games-hobbies/Ho...rATVCarburetor

And this one is good too and has a video:
https://www.rockymountainatvmc.com/r...otorcycle-atv/

Do you have to uninstall the carb from your Raptor to clean or rebuild it. NO.

Most people loosen up the intake boots (the boot that connects the air filter to the carb, and the head intake boot (the boot that connects the carb to the head) and rotate the carb to the RIGHT (if you're sitting on the Raptor you would TILT the carb to the RIGHT making the bottom of the carb swing out from the bottom position toward your left side).
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:30 AM Thread Starter
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Carburetors General Jetting

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Below is a GENERAL Information regarding JETTING that is NOT specific to the raptor 350 but a general guide.

1) Pilot jet/slow jet – Affects mixture from idle to 1/3 throttle opening. The pilot jet meters fuel to the “bottom end circuits”

2) Air screw – Meters air to pilot jet. It is usually located near the back or air box side of the carb. Turning in clockwise, will richen the pilot mixture. Turning out, counter clockwise, will lean out the pilot mixture. Average setting for most 2 strokes is 1 to 2 1/2 turns out. Refer to owner’s manual.

Note: If the adjustment screw is in the front of the carb, it is a fuel screw and not an air screw; it is adjusted the opposite of the air screw. Most 4-strokes are this way.

3) Jet needle aka Needle – Affects the mixture from 1/4 throttle to full throttle. The needle is in the leanest position when the clip is on the top, and richest on the bottom. The needle calibrates the full to the change in throttle valve (slide) opening. The further down the needle is, the later the main jet comes on and the leaner the mixture at that point.

4) Main Jet – This circuit affects the mixture from 1/2 throttle to full throttle. This is your full blast top end circuit. This circuit is most accurately tuned by checking the plug for the correct color, sort of mocha brown.

5) Float/Float valve/Float level – Your owner’s manual has the correct level and procedure for calibrating your bike. Here are some symptoms that would indicate the need for float adjustment.

A) If float level is too high, the float bowl overflows out the drain hoses, and fuel often blocks the air passages that allow the carb to de-pressurize. This causes a bog, or hiccup over large hits.

B) If float level is too low, the engine starves for fuel off idle, causing a “boooooowang” sound very similar to a pilot jet or air screw set too lean.

Jetting Guidelines; Eliminating the variables.

1) Never change more than one circuit at a time. You need this tool to tell you exactly which circuit is affecting performance and at what throttle opening.

2) Use fresh gas. Octane ratings diminish with time and the higher the octane the slower the burn and richer the mixture. The quality of today’s pump gas is decreasing. To compensate for the fuel, richer jets are required. Also note that fuel with ethanol (aka MTBE) also requires a slightly richer mixture.

3) Always start with a fresh air filter. Let a freshly oiled air filter dry at least 6 hours in advance so that the alcohol in the air filter can evaporate. Then match the carb to a motor that breathes properly. Otherwise, the engine will run slightly leaner when the clean air filter is installed.

4) When performing a plug check, use a good used spark plug. New plugs are white and are hard to read accurately for mixture checks. If you have to use a new plug be sure to put at least 15 to 20 hard minutes on it before attempting to get a reading.

5) Always check for clogged carb vent lines. Clogged lines will cause hard starting and bogging when the motor is hot. They can also cause erratic running that seems to mimic a mis-adjusted float, but worse. Performance will seem rich and acceleration will be sluggish off idle.

6) If you’re trying to track down a jetting problem, don’t change your premix oil brand or the ratio. The pre-mix ratio will determine how much fuel is available to be burned because the oil isn’t burned, and in terms of liquid volume, the oil takes up a portion of the liquid (oil + fuel). While the ratio will have a minimal impact when making small changes, remember that you’re trying to eliminate variables.

How to Jet

1) Mark your throttle housing and grip in 1/4 turn increments. Use a marker, razor blade, etc.

2) Now get the motor to operating temperature by riding around, away from the pits.

3) Once the motor is warm, ride in 2nd and 3rd gear from the low RPM to high RPM. This puts a good load on the motor and is an accurate test of performance.

* try to notice if the problem gets worse or better as the motor heats up.

4) Now try to locate the throttle opening at which the problem exists. See details just below.

Rich Jetting Symptoms and Solutions

A) Motor won’t idle and idle set screw is ineffective. Try leaning out the air screw by turning it counter clockwise a quarter turn at a time. If the air screw has no effect, install a leaner pilot jet and return the air screw to 1 turn out. Proper air screw settings are usually between 1 and 2 1/2 turns out. The correct pilot for your bike is one that allows instant off-idle throttle response, and allows the air screw to be effective between 1 and 2.5 turns out. If the problem still exists, check and clean the choke circuit and carb vent lines.

B) Motor stumbles off idle to 1/2 throttle, then cleans up. If everything in part A above is correct, check the needle. Stock position is usually in the middle, but check your owner’s manual to be sure. To lean out the needle, you need to raise the clip. If the needle is dropped all the way lean and problem still exists, try a leaner needle.

C. Motor will rev through the mid range then becomes gurgley (technical term) at full throttle and power is sluggish. This is a text book example of a rich main jet. This problem often occurs when an air filter becomes clogged and gets worse as the motor heats up. Choose a main jet with a smaller number and lean out the air fuel mixture one step at a time. If the problem still persists even though it’s improved a little, reinstall your original main jet and lean out the needle one position. Now fine tune the main jet with plug checks.

Plug checks are the key to fine tuning the main jet once the other circuits are set.

White Porcelain Chocolate Mocha Brown Black/Wet

Lean Perfect! Rich

Look for symmetrical burn patterns, smell for odors like burnt plastic, which is actually tranny fluid and would be indicative of a blown seal.

Lean Jetting Symptoms and Solutions

A) Motor hesitates off idle with a “Boooooooooowang” sound. This is a lean symptom and often occurs when a motor is cold. Try turning the air-fuel screw clockwise a quarter turn richer and check throttle response again until motor revs without hesitation. If the motor “hangs up” or doesn’t come right back down to idle, install a richer pilot, and reset air screw.

B) Motor knock knock knocks at idle when hot. Try solution A. If problem persists, perform a “leakdown pressure test” to check for ignition crank seal leakage.

C) Motor revs clean and crisp but runs really hot and lacks power. This symptom indicates a lean main jet and/or needle. Use a richer main jet and/or needle setting. This is the most common misconception about two stroke jetting: When a motor runs excessively hot and lacks power, it is on the verge of seizing. If you are on the trail and don’t have the right main jet, try raising the needle by lowering the clip. It won’t be exact but at least you won’t seize.

Note: To be certain that your problem is lean, pull on the choke and see if the problem gets better or worse. If better, your problem is a lean condition.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:31 AM Thread Starter
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:35 AM Thread Starter
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Idle Mixture Screw Adjustment ONLY

===============================================

http://www.thejunkmanadv.com/how-to-...djustment.html
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:37 AM Thread Starter
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Yet another Jetting from joequad16 I think this is for Dual Raptor 660 Carbs but 660s simply have two 350 carbs. I like this one though.

=============

Pilot Screw - Idle
Pilot Jet - Idle to 1/4 throttle
Needle Jet and Jet needle - 1/4 to 3/4 throttle
Main Jet - 3/4 to full throttle

1) Idle Screw
Allow the engine to reach operating temperature. turn to smooth idle. If unable to obtain smooth idle, go to Step 2, Pilot Screw

2) Pilot Screw
If unable to obtain smooth idle: turn the pilot screw in all the way GENTLY until it bottoms, then turn the pilot screw 1/4 turn at a time until achieving a smooth idle. The pilot screw should be correct between 1- 2.5 turns. If idle is between 1-2.5 turns, the jump to step 4, Main Jet. If idle is NOT smooth between 1-2.5 turns, then jump to step 3, Pilot/ Slow jet.

3) Pilot/Slow Jet
If idle is not smooth with pilot screw between 1-2.5 turns, then the pilot/slow jet needs to be changed. There are 2 choices. either A or B
A - If the pilot screw has been turned more then 2.5 turns to smooth the idle, then install a bigger Pilot.
B - If the pilot screw has been turned less the 1 turn to reach smooth idle, then install a smaller Pilot.

Note! A larger pilot jet will eliminate the popping sound that may occur when letting off the throttle.
A larger will improve cold-weather starts.

4) Main Jet
Start with the richest (largest numbered) main jet and test at full throttle. the engine should "stumble" at wide open throttle (If engine does not stumble, then the engine is not rich enough and a larger main jet should be installed). Once you have a rich "stumble", install the next smaller jet one size at a time until full throttle results in normal operation. Once main jet step is complete, go back to step 2, Pilot Screw, and perform pilot screw adjustments one last time.

Note! If quad runs faster at 3/4 throttle then at Full throttle, then the jets are lean and a larger jet must be installed.

Needle
If carburetor has an adjustable needle, this step CAN be performed. If you have a slight hesitation but NOT a hard stumble between 1/4 -3/4 throttle, then the needle is probably lean. Raise the needle by lowering the clip.

Reading Spark Plugs
Once the main jet is set correctly by dropping a main jet size after the "stumble", confirm the jetting of the engine by reading the spark plug. This works best in top gear in a slight uphill area. After running at full throttle, do the following at the same time: pull in the clutch and stop the engine, DO NOT LET THE ENGINE IDLE! Remove the spark plug amd examine the color. It should be a Light Tan. If it is white, then the engine is running lean and a bigger Main Jet must be installed. If the color is Black, then the engine is running rich and a smaller Main Jet must be installed.
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Old 10-30-2015, 06:56 AM Thread Starter
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Raptor 350 Reading Spark Plugs to determine Lean or Rich Mixture Adjustments
==================================================

Reading your Spark Plugs tells you ALOT. Make sure to check your plug. You want that LIGHT TAN COLOR to DARK TAN. Note you need to follow the steps though to get the correct TIME to read the color (prior post).

Factory Spark Plug = NGK DR8EA
Factory Spark Plug Gap (ALWAYS CHECK) = 0.6mm - 0.7mm

Suggested Spark Plug = Iridium NGK DR8EIX
Suggested Spark Plug Gap (ALWAYS CHECK) = 0.6mm - 0.7mm

I run a NGK Iridium which part number DR8EIX.

Do what you want but I feel starts easier and revs faster. And I kind notice things like that if you cant tell. And it runs like $6 bucks

Last image is Spark Plug torque! DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN MR MUSCLES. DO NOT STRIP THE THREADS OUT.
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Last edited by sharpraptor; 10-30-2015 at 07:04 AM.
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Old 10-30-2015, 07:32 AM Thread Starter
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Raptor 350 Engine and Transmission Oil Type and Weight
==================================================

This could be another long discussion. Refer to the manual for details. Also, there is a prior post about oil and quantities. This post is specifically for oil type and weight (not capacity which the other post details).

Factory Recommended Oil Type: YamaLube 4
Factory Recommended Oil Weight: Depends on Operating Climate but most people use 10w-30 in colder climates like Midwest or Canada // and 20w-40 in hot climates such as latin america and US southwest.

You can use the chart below to determine what you want to use. You can use another oil than YamaLube, which I have, BUT IT MUST SAY ON THE BOTTLE 'WET CLUTCH APPROVED', OR 'JASO' or 'FOR MOTORCYCLE/ATV' (which the last one I am iffy on). If you use oil thats made for a regular car or truck YOU WILL HAVE PROBLEMS BECAUSE THE TRANSMISSION AND CLUTCH USE THE ENGINE OIL TOO.
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