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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sometime this year I'm planning on going with +2 Houser arms. I ride mostly trails. Is there an advantage to going with long travel arms and shocks or just stick with the regular +2 arms?
 

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Long travel is more suited for big jumps and high speed whoops.
For trails, standard length shocks are fine, just set the suspension sag correctly on either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Long travel is more suited for big jumps and high speed whoops.
For trails, standard length shocks are fine, just set the suspension sag correctly on either.
Ok so regular +2 arms and shocks for me.

Next question: +3 axle make sense as well? Worth the upgrade?

Last question: Once going to +2 arms and maybe +3 axle, other than longer brake lines, what else do I need to modify?

Thanks!
 

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+3" overall on the axle is fine, as that keeps the front 1" wider overall.
Do not make the rear as wide or wider than the front, or it will negatively effect turning and overall handling.
Make sure suspension sag is correct front and rear. One directly effects the other.
And, if the chain is too tight, it'll limit rear shock travel and throw off front And rear suspension.
Having Jocaga Suspension respring and/or revalve all 3 shocks for Your weight and riding style is the best handling upgrade you can do to it too.
Otherwise, you don't need any other parts than A-arms with longer lines and the axle itself.
New rear bearings are a good idea with a new axle though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Interesting a
+3" overall on the axle is fine, as that keeps the front 1" wider overall.
Do not make the rear as wide or wider than the front, or it will negatively effect turning and overall handling.
Make sure suspension sag is correct front and rear. One directly effects the other.
And, if the chain is too tight, it'll limit rear shock travel and throw off front And rear suspension.
Having Jocaga Suspension respring and/or revalve all 3 shocks for Your weight and riding style is the best handling upgrade you can do to it too.
Otherwise, you don't need any other parts than A-arms with longer lines and the axle itself.
New rear bearings are a good idea with a new axle though.
Interesting point about the rear end being wider than the front. Is there advantage at all to widening the rear any amount? Or just stick with the wider front end and leave the back end stock?
 

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Interesting a


Interesting point about the rear end being wider than the front. Is there advantage at all to widening the rear any amount? Or just stick with the wider front end and leave the back end stock?
The width of the rear vs the front is personal preference and how the handling feels(again as long as the front is wider).
A good example of why the front needs to be wider is; have you ever ridden a 3 wheeler?
If so, you know how they tip when you turn.
The effect is the same on a 4 wheeler with a wider rear than front, just not as severe, but still noticeable. Much easier to roll, especially with speed and sharp turns.
A wider front and rear on a 4wheeler obviously makes it more stable.
It does make it harder to roll over to either side, but keep in mind that if it does roll to either side...it took more effort to cause that, and you are rolling over with much more force and speed.
Lowering helps decrease those chances, but once again, if you roll, it will be with more force, aside from lost ground clearance, which is no good under most conditions(aside from say flat track or street riding).
For trails I just stay stock width, but if I added +2" A-arms(+4" overall), I would add a +2/+4 adjustable width axle, and use the spacers for a +2" or +3" overall rear width.
A friend of mine also bought a 700 a few years ago with +3" A-arms(+6" overall) and it was too wide to rip most wooded trails, always clipping trees with the wheels.
 

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I’ve been running a tusk extended axle on my raptor for years now with tons of ride time. It’s adjusted as wide as it can go, and the front is bone stock width. I’ve never had any issues with handling


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It is definately noticeable in high speed cornering and drifts.
They are much more stable with the front wider than the rear.
Not to say it can't be ridden hard with the rear wider, but it's not as capable.
 

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Took mine yesterday for the first hard trail ride and I have standard +2 housers n durablue 2+2 rear axle with my shocks rebuilt n revalved by jogaca and it handled amazing I couldn't believe the difference and I'm a big dude. I'm 6'2 400lbs n it handled amazing ripping up the trails
140916
 
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