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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found a great method I want to share with everyone. This method allows spray paint to easily be applied to your plastic. The reason most spray paint doesn't stick very well is because the plastic has a release agent in it to help release it from the mold when manufactured. Here's how to get that out of your plastic.

Things you'll need: handheld propane torch, rubbing alcohol (the strong 91% available at most stores like Walmart), a spray bottle for the alcohol , and a microfiber cloth.

First you want to start by cleaning up your plastic really well with some dish liquid and a scotch bright pad. The pad will rough up the plastic enough so you won't have to sand. Once its cleaned wipe dry with a microfiber cloth. Now you will need your handheld propane torch , you want to wave the torch across the plastic to heat it up. Obviously you want to keep moving and not hold it in any one spot for too long. You will notice that the plastic begins to look wet. That is the release agent coming to the surface. Try to do a small area at a time since you want to quickly wipe the release agent off. Now take your spray bottle with rubbing alcohol and spray the wet looking area. Spray a good bit of alcohol on it. Now wipe the plastic completely dry and repeat the steps until finished. You also want to make sure that you get the back side around the edges done as well so the paint will wrap around. I learned this technique from a video on YouTube. It's the owner of a paint company called K2 concepts. My cousin used this technique to paint his dirtbike plastics and it worked great. I hope this helps anyone that wants to paint their plastic. I'll get some pics up soon of mine when it is finished. Good luck and be careful. Don't want anyone to light themselves on fire
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also want to mention that once this is done you are ready to paint. No sanding needed. You'll get the best results if you prime first or use a bonding agent. We used primer and it worked great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just wanted a written version because the video could be removed at any time. Figured it was worth having a more permanent version.
 

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Also want to mention that once this is done you are ready to paint. No sanding needed. You'll get the best results if you prime first or use a bonding agent. We used primer and it worked great.
you always want to sand the plastics.... at least a wet sand with 500 or 1000 grit. as soon as the plastics bend a little bit the paint will flake. also when you let the paint cure its best to cure them in low temperatures. this will make the paint more flexable;)
 

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Thinking about doing this....
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That's good to know. That's some great info you have there.
 

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Master of the Electron
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I would start of painting with a coat of Adhesion Promoter.
 

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Is there a way to confirm you've removed all the release agent? Will it stop "sweating" ever? Or is it something you have to repeat many times? Or, does the one pass, as shown in the video, tend to make the piece good enough for paint?

End machine gun questions.
 
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