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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

:eek:Just a word of advice i installed mine last week and i used about 3 tie straps to hold the harness in place along the frame to make sure that it wouldn't move...... :grin_nod:
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

and my 2 cents on tapping into the TPS wire i found it eaier to take off the right fareing bolt and reach it from the side....mine was really stuck on good i had to use a flat head to pry it off (make sure really careful if do this) once tapped in i used electrical tape to make it really secure......

p.s. i ordered mine from fuel moto.....works great.... :haha:
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fu

I was wondering cali how long it took for your install and how long would you estimate out of all that time it took you to take the photos (in order words if you didn't have photos to take how long would it of taken?) I'm thinking of getting a PC but I'll probably be asking my dealership to make the install. Also, are there any install instructions that come with the device itself (I would hope so) and would it be possible to make it available online. Thanks.

Erik
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

It is a very easy install you could do it yourself no problem. I found it easier to remove the plastics aswell. It gives you alittle more room to do the job right and not break anything.
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fu

chevz7194 said:
It is a very easy install you could do it yourself no problem. I found it easier to remove the plastics aswell. It gives you alittle more room to do the job right and not break anything.
Thanks for the comments, and just to reply to my own post I'd like to point out I found a direct link to the install instructions which is:

http://www.powercommander.com/maps/install/I416-411.pdf


Erik
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

air said:
Wiring issues from corrosion take time, water, mud etc to develope and they will.
Its not about now its about a few years from now.
For the $$$ one spends on a PC3 why wouldnt they put a better connector on it.

Air, they don't gear their installs to people like you and I, they gear them for the mechanically/electrically challenged general public. If you bought one you would solder it up and put heat shrink tubing on it, so it's really no big deal. ( I know shit like this bugs me to ;)) I rarley use any of the connectors supplied with any electrical component, I prefer ancor marine grade connectors that you can shrink with a heat gun or pocket torch when your finished, the same as you would do with heat shrink tube only you don't need the heat shrink tube or the solder. They work slicker than owl shit and have been proven for years in harsh marine enviroments 8)
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fu

Rapt7ooR said:
I was wondering cali how long it took for your install and how long would you estimate out of all that time it took you to take the photos (in order words if you didn't have photos to take how long would it of taken?) I'm thinking of getting a PC but I'll probably be asking my dealership to make the install. Also, are there any install instructions that come with the device itself (I would hope so) and would it be possible to make it available online. Thanks.

Erik
I've taken off the plastics so many times on the 700r, for both mine and my co-tester, but for a first timer, with reading, getting the right work area together and tools, I would say definately say no more than 90 min's from beginning to the very end. But if your knowledgable, perhaps just under 30 min's.

Peace.
Mr. C
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

So the PCIII install is easy, but with the wire tap, whats an easy way to avoid corrosion.. i do alot of woods riding, and theres usually always mud... I dont know much about soldering and all that, so if theres an easier solution for a beginner that would be awesome...
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

GcSChi22 said:
So the PCIII install is easy, but with the wire tap, whats an easy way to avoid corrosion.. i do alot of woods riding, and theres usually always mud... I dont know much about soldering and all that, so if theres an easier solution for a beginner that would be awesome...
The TAP pieces are all plastic, and have an outer layer of plastic, with the metal contact piece that pierces the yellow wire on the 700r, and then the male connector taps into the TAP and it is all sealed. With the plastic peices from the TAP, the boot that goes around and protects the OEM plugin and a little bit of electrical tape, I think the whole idea of corrossion,etc. is being a little bit played out to an extreme. But hey, that area of the quad is fairly well protected and underneath the tank, so I theres only so much water or mud or anything that will get up in there. I haven't had any issues to date and I have been riding and washing alot (knocks on wood).

Peace.
Mr. C
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

That goes for me too. Powerwash all the time, and ride in dirt/mud. Everything is fine. Nothing is anymore exposed then from the factory. Some people just like being EXTRA cautious
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

135boom said:
That goes for me too. Powerwash all the time, and ride in dirt/mud. Everything is fine. Nothing is anymore exposed then from the factory. Some people just like being EXTRA cautious



That wire tap is nothing more than a glorified scotch lock, the cut rate hitch installers use to use them to tap into the wiring harness before all the trucks came pre wired from the factory and they were nothing but trouble after a while. If I had a dollar for every one of those I trouble shot and chased down over the years I could pay for my Stroker kit.

Can't ever be to cautious when it comes to Mechanical and electrical, being to cautious has never cost me a dime ;)
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

I agree with you, but heres the thing. First, its under the gas tank, not exactly exposed to the elements. 2nd, there is NO bare wire showing or anything. That thing simply spliced right into the original wire. Three, that connection has just as much metal showing as any other connection on the quad.

I dont see what you are concerned about. Is it the best and safest design ever...NO. Will it work and more than likely never have a problem...I am betting yes. All I did was cut a little slot in the orginal boot so it would slide over, then ziptyed it down.

Off all things to be worried about, I dont think this should be very high on the priority list. No exposed wire, Not volnerable, and Same amount of metal being exposed on this connection as any other connection found in the quad.

Will I spray the pressure washer directly on it...NO, but I have not taken any extra care when washing my quad either, and everything is A-OK :thumbsup:
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

RaptorRandy27 is right Scotch locks will cause problems over time. it is not if but when.
I think the first ones that will start having problem will live near salty environments. no place on a quad is protected from salty humidity.
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fu

135boom said:
I agree with you, but heres the thing. First, its under the gas tank, not exactly exposed to the elements. 2nd, there is NO bare wire showing or anything. That thing simply spliced right into the original wire. Three, that connection has just as much metal showing as any other connection on the quad.

I dont see what you are concerned about. Is it the best and safest design ever...NO. Will it work and more than likely never have a problem...I am betting yes. All I did was cut a little slot in the orginal boot so it would slide over, then ziptyed it down.

Off all things to be worried about, I dont think this should be very high on the priority list. No exposed wire, Not volnerable, and Same amount of metal being exposed on this connection as any other connection found in the quad.

Will I spray the pressure washer directly on it...NO, but I have not taken any extra care when washing my quad either, and everything is A-OK :thumbsup:
Those line splices are typically made from REALLY cheap metal, that's strike one. Strike two is that you don't need DIRECT water touching it to rust it. Most bare metals will rust JUST from the humidity in the air. Strike three is inevatable.... either by some miracle water will get on it, or it will just rust over time, and for some OTHER reason you have to move the gas tank, and you tweak the wire just enough to make an intermittant connection on the splice, and there you are with a pain in the ass connection. Also, because you have cut the shielding on a factory wire, it too will face certain destruction due to corrosion. Soon it will weaken and break.... then you'll be up shit creek.

As an example... on my ATV trailer... the previous owner had a very nice wiring kit on it, and the plug that goes into the truck was nicely setup, but it had a CLOTH shroud that encased all the wires as they came from the trailer to the truck. All was fine with that setup, because it's designed to protect the wires from UV rot, and also designed to allow any water to evaporate through it's poreous surface. However, they tried to out think the wiring kit manufacturer, and wraped the entire thing with electrical tape. Well, now the cloth acted as a wick and pulled water INTO the sleeve, and held it there for a much longer time, and the water sitting on the wires all the time eventually rotted them through. When I pulled it apart I unwrapped the tape, and the stench was awefull. I had to replace several wires and re-crimp several connections that were totally destroyed.

The bottom line is this: Those cheap splicing connectors are great for car sterios, but won't hold up on a vehicle's exterrior.... especially an offroad vehicle. Are you really going to go riding and when you see a little in the trail, turn around and tell your buddies you can't go through it because of a half assed connector that you're afraid to get wet. We've heard plenty of stories of people getting water/mud into their airboxes, and I've personally seen signs of water splashes up on the top of my airbox, so I would be very worried about that connection if I were you. You would be much better off to find a waterproof connector, and cut and re-connect everything properly with water tight connectors and di-electric grease.

As a parting shot, consider this: If it does fail... will it be in the shop, or on the trail? If it does fail, would you pay a dollar to have it working again? That's all a waterproof connection costs.

-SS
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

You know, I totally see what your saying, but I think your are making a mountain out of a mole hill. AND, if it does corode the quad isnt ruined. Nothing is ruined. Take the stupid thing off and buy another cheap piece of crap or make another connection. Its not like the whole system is toast if a connection rusts.....geez. "doom and gloom"

Where I ride isnt near salt water. The only thing it faces is an occassional splash of water, which its guarded pretty well from splashes right now anyway.

I am not trying to say its the best design, but what did you expect. It needed to stay simple and cheap. We are already paying alot for these PCIII's. I am going to keep mine the way it is, and keep an eye on it. I really dont think its that big of a deal. It really isnt exposed to the elements like the under side of a truck or anything.
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

Boom,
This isn't doom and gloom were spreading here it's electrical basics 101
Were just trying to share some knowledge gained from years of expereance :banghead:


Sandsquid went into great detail and explained it much better than I as did Air
What is there to dispute? Remember the old saying "If it's worth doing it's worth doing right" 8)


But hey, your entitled to your own opinion, I just find it odd that coming from a former pilot you above all would understand the importance of good solid electrical connections.
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fuel?"

RaptorRandy27 said:
Boom,
This isn't doom and gloom were spreading here it's electrical basics 101
Were just trying to share some knowledge gained from years of expereance :banghead:


Sandsquid went into great detail and explained it much better than I as did Air
What is there to dispute? Remember the old saying "If it's worth doing it's worth doing right" 8)


But hey, your entitled to your own opinion, I just find it odd that coming from a former pilot you above all would understand the importance of good solid electrical connections.
I hear you guys and believe me, I can understand what your all saying. But if its DynoJets doing, then it must be OK? Another option would of been to do a pass through design for the TPS wire/connector, just like they did for the fuel injector, that would of been the best and easiest type of conection. But then how much would that bring up the cost of the PC III? I'll send my contact at DynoJet this information, maybe they can come up with something to make everyone happy, and feel more secure of this connection being reliable and less prone in the future to failure.

Thanks,
Mr. C
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fu

OK, just so we're clear on this... WHICH WIRE ARE YOU SPLICING IN TO? Because perhaps I didn't emphesize enough that the wire you splice in to will also start to corrode. It won't happen over night, but say in 5 years from now if you've been into a bit of water it will be corroded enough to become weak and could break. Since the wire you are splicing in to is part of the factory wiring harness, you will have to repair that link, not just buy a new splice kit and re-splice. Also, if that wire goes to the fuel injector, the throttle position sensor, or some other critical piece of hardware, when the wire breaks, (and it will break) it will completely disable the machine. And like I said before, it's highly unlikely that it will break in the shop, but it is most likely that it will break out in the dunes, or trails or wherever you are when you are 10 miles from your truck, tools, and cell phone.

The power commander may not be required, but whatever you are splicing in to IS REQUIRED to run the machine, and thus a waterproof splice is neccesary.

As to the reason the PCIII kit comes with the cheapest possible connector, I'll offer you two:

1) Instructions are easier with a splice that's easier. A waterproof connection is more difficult to apply properly, and if done wrong can actually make it worse by trapping water INSIDE the connector and accelerating corrosion.

2) the allmighty dollar. For comparison, and ease of math, we'll use nice round numbers. They might not be exact, but are realisitic enough to explain my point: a) the connector that comes with the kit costs $.10. b) the waterproof connector costs $1.00. c) the makers of PCIII intend to sell 1,000 units this year.

Now, with that knowledge, you can calculate that the cost of ALL the connectors they are putting in those 1000 kits will only cost them $100. But if they use a waterproof connector in the kit, it costs them $1000. So there's a $900 profit to be had by putting a crappy connector in the kit instead of a waterproof one.

$900 is not a big deal, and probably wouldn't persuade a business man to go cheap, but then again, I've never seen a company do that much engineering and work only to sell 1,000 units. More likely, they are interested in selling 10,000 in the year to come, and growing to 100,000 the next year or two.

Instead of a $900 decision, now we are talking 9K? 90K? That's going to make payments on the boss's new BMW. Now it's getting tempting to put a crappy connector in... especially if they will NEVER GET SUED over it. It's not life critical, so nobody is going to die because of a bad connector. If customers complain about the quality of it, they can simply tell the customer to run over to Radio Shack and spend the extra buck, or even send the 1 or 2 complaining customers the right kind of connector to keep them happy, and it won't hit the bottom line all that hard.

It's the story of mass prodution. Don't think for a minute that those guys give a damn if you win your next race, they don't give a damn if your machine breaks down in the middle of your trail ride and leaves you to push your machine back to camp. It's a simple cash option to them.

Sorry this post went a little longer than I expected. But anyway, it's only a buck.... just go down to radio shack and get what you need to do it right. I mean if your really that hard up for cash, skip that 64oz soda you were planning on getting at the gas station after work today... that alone will just about pay for it.

-SS
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fu

sandsquid said:
OK, just so we're clear on this... WHICH WIRE ARE YOU SPLICING IN TO? Because perhaps I didn't emphesize enough that the wire you splice in to will also start to corrode. It won't happen over night, but say in 5 years from now if you've been into a bit of water it will be corroded enough to become weak and could break. Since the wire you are splicing in to is part of the factory wiring harness, you will have to repair that link, not just buy a new splice kit and re-splice. Also, if that wire goes to the fuel injector, the throttle position sensor, or some other critical piece of hardware, when the wire breaks, (and it will break) it will completely disable the machine. And like I said before, it's highly unlikely that it will break in the shop, but it is most likely that it will break out in the dunes, or trails or wherever you are when you are 10 miles from your truck, tools, and cell phone.

The power commander may not be required, but whatever you are splicing in to IS REQUIRED to run the machine, and thus a waterproof splice is neccesary.

As to the reason the PCIII kit comes with the cheapest possible connector, I'll offer you two:

1) Instructions are easier with a splice that's easier. A waterproof connection is more difficult to apply properly, and if done wrong can actually make it worse by trapping water INSIDE the connector and accelerating corrosion.

2) the allmighty dollar. For comparison, and ease of math, we'll use nice round numbers. They might not be exact, but are realisitic enough to explain my point: a) the connector that comes with the kit costs $.10. b) the waterproof connector costs $1.00. c) the makers of PCIII intend to sell 1,000 units this year.

Now, with that knowledge, you can calculate that the cost of ALL the connectors they are putting in those 1000 kits will only cost them $100. But if they use a waterproof connector in the kit, it costs them $1000. So there's a $900 profit to be had by putting a crappy connector in the kit instead of a waterproof one.

$900 is not a big deal, and probably wouldn't persuade a business man to go cheap, but then again, I've never seen a company do that much engineering and work only to sell 1,000 units. More likely, they are interested in selling 10,000 in the year to come, and growing to 100,000 the next year or two.

Instead of a $900 decision, now we are talking 9K? 90K? That's going to make payments on the boss's new BMW. Now it's getting tempting to put a crappy connector in... especially if they will NEVER GET SUED over it. It's not life critical, so nobody is going to die because of a bad connector. If customers complain about the quality of it, they can simply tell the customer to run over to Radio Shack and spend the extra buck, or even send the 1 or 2 complaining customers the right kind of connector to keep them happy, and it won't hit the bottom line all that hard.

It's the story of mass prodution. Don't think for a minute that those guys give a damn if you win your next race, they don't give a damn if your machine breaks down in the middle of your trail ride and leaves you to push your machine back to camp. It's a simple cash option to them.

Sorry this post went a little longer than I expected. But anyway, it's only a buck.... just go down to radio shack and get what you need to do it right. I mean if your really that hard up for cash, skip that 64oz soda you were planning on getting at the gas station after work today... that alone will just about pay for it.

-SS
Thats a very good point. THE MOTIVATOR = $$$$$$$

I was just refering to how on the PC III ties into the Fuel Injector, they use a two series of bypass connectors that actually connect right into each other "bypass", and then continue to the fuel injector, just like OEM type connector. The TAP (the yellow wire that gets tapped) goes into the TPS harness/connector, and perhaps, DynoJet should of used the same type of bypass, to alleviate any sort of mishap down the road.

Thanks,
Mr. C
 

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Re: DynoJet Power Commander - Installation & Review - "Is your 700r thirsty 4 fu

CaliRaptor700r said:
sandsquid said:
OK, just so we're clear on this... WHICH WIRE ARE YOU SPLICING IN TO? Because perhaps I didn't emphesize enough that the wire you splice in to will also start to corrode. It won't happen over night, but say in 5 years from now if you've been into a bit of water it will be corroded enough to become weak and could break. Since the wire you are splicing in to is part of the factory wiring harness, you will have to repair that link, not just buy a new splice kit and re-splice. Also, if that wire goes to the fuel injector, the throttle position sensor, or some other critical piece of hardware, when the wire breaks, (and it will break) it will completely disable the machine. And like I said before, it's highly unlikely that it will break in the shop, but it is most likely that it will break out in the dunes, or trails or wherever you are when you are 10 miles from your truck, tools, and cell phone.

The power commander may not be required, but whatever you are splicing in to IS REQUIRED to run the machine, and thus a waterproof splice is neccesary.

As to the reason the PCIII kit comes with the cheapest possible connector, I'll offer you two:

1) Instructions are easier with a splice that's easier. A waterproof connection is more difficult to apply properly, and if done wrong can actually make it worse by trapping water INSIDE the connector and accelerating corrosion.

2) the allmighty dollar. For comparison, and ease of math, we'll use nice round numbers. They might not be exact, but are realisitic enough to explain my point: a) the connector that comes with the kit costs $.10. b) the waterproof connector costs $1.00. c) the makers of PCIII intend to sell 1,000 units this year.

Now, with that knowledge, you can calculate that the cost of ALL the connectors they are putting in those 1000 kits will only cost them $100. But if they use a waterproof connector in the kit, it costs them $1000. So there's a $900 profit to be had by putting a crappy connector in the kit instead of a waterproof one.

$900 is not a big deal, and probably wouldn't persuade a business man to go cheap, but then again, I've never seen a company do that much engineering and work only to sell 1,000 units. More likely, they are interested in selling 10,000 in the year to come, and growing to 100,000 the next year or two.

Instead of a $900 decision, now we are talking 9K? 90K? That's going to make payments on the boss's new BMW. Now it's getting tempting to put a crappy connector in... especially if they will NEVER GET SUED over it. It's not life critical, so nobody is going to die because of a bad connector. If customers complain about the quality of it, they can simply tell the customer to run over to Radio Shack and spend the extra buck, or even send the 1 or 2 complaining customers the right kind of connector to keep them happy, and it won't hit the bottom line all that hard.

It's the story of mass prodution. Don't think for a minute that those guys give a damn if you win your next race, they don't give a damn if your machine breaks down in the middle of your trail ride and leaves you to push your machine back to camp. It's a simple cash option to them.

Sorry this post went a little longer than I expected. But anyway, it's only a buck.... just go down to radio shack and get what you need to do it right. I mean if your really that hard up for cash, skip that 64oz soda you were planning on getting at the gas station after work today... that alone will just about pay for it.

-SS
Thats a very good point. THE MOTIVATOR = $$$$$$$

I was just refering to how on the PC III ties into the Fuel Injector, they use a two series of bypass connectors that actually connect right into each other "bypass", and then continue to the fuel injector, just like OEM type connector. The TAP (the yellow wire that gets tapped) goes into the TPS harness/connector, and perhaps, DynoJet should of used the same type of bypass, to alleviate any sort of mishap down the road.

Thanks,
Mr. C
A piggyback or bypass connector is how it should have been done.
 
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