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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I have read up alot in past years and have gathered quite a bit of knowledge about general turbocharging. What I am going to do is tell what i know and what I need is someone to sort of "fill in the blanks" per say. Any and all help would be appreciated, thanks.

Ok I understand that the turbo must be mounted to the exhaust manifold and exhaust tubing then run from the "downpipe" wherever you would personally preffer, oil lines ran and air cleaner mounted to the intake side of the unit. Piping runs from the outlet either straight to the fuel supply (carb/throttle body) or through an intercooler and then to your fuel supply. I know the waste gate is mounted before the turbocharger itself as it "regulates" exhaust flow through the unit. I also know the blow off valve should be mounted in the intake piping just before the fuel supply to relieve manifold pressure due to the throttle plate opening and closing.
What I really need to know is what would be the proper way to run the oil supply lines?
Where do the lines from my blow off valve hook?
How is a boost controller hooked up?
And lastly, what important information have i overlooked or given a mistake on?

Thanks for taking the time to read, I could really use the knowledge.
 

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And lastly, what important information have i overlooked or given a mistake on?
Doing it on a carbureted motor is a royal pain. If you have to build a box that totaly incloses the carburetors. That way the whole carburetor is at the same pressure. Other wise the pressurized air going through the carb throats will just spray the fuel back out the overflow tubes if the ouside of the carb is at a lower pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Gotchya, I think I already experienced this once with an "experimental" project using a 660 raptor. I understand the pressure difference concept and why I would need to construct a box. However I've read that in some instances (not sure if it applies to atv's) they make "blow thru" setup carbs. Most say the difference is with power valves, float material and an atmospheric vent tube to help compensate the changes in pressure. Using this as a reference and seeing as I still would like to persue this ideal anyhow, is there any way to perhaps add/modify an atmospheric vent to help compensate the pressure changes or should I primarily stick with the idea of building a box over the carbs?
 

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Piping from the outlet does not run to your fuel supply. You run oil lines to the turbocharger to cool it. Where you hook up the lines on the engine is up to you.

Turbo Inlet - Exhaust gases leaving the engine entering the turbocharger.

Turbo Discharge (outlet) - Waste gases leaving the turbocharger through your exhaust system.

Compressor Inlet - Ambient air going into the turbocharger via your intake.

Compressor Discharge (outlet) - Compressed air going to the intercooler and then into the engine via the throttle body or carburetor.

The blow off valve is connected between your turbocharger and carburetor/throttle body to release air. It basically releases the charged air being sent into the carburetor/throttle body when you release the throttle.
 

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the lowest $$$ i seen with turbo-carb setup was a low $$ mud runner they had the carbs before the turbo it had awful lag but they made it run . long therm ????
Who's got the balls let me know. parts are expensive for atv's
 

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You are describing a 'puffer' style turbo, in which the pressure is generated before the carb and the carb(s) and everything downstream is placed under that pressure. This is a very difficult system to implement from scratch on the Raptor, especially with the dual carbs (you must build a pressure box around the carbs and have a boost variable fuel pressure pump/regulator).

A much easier implementation for the Raptor is a 'Huffer' turbo, in which the carbs are before the turbo, and the turbo sucks air and fuel thru the carbs and pushes it into the intake manifold - this requires very little change to the carbs themselves and can be done with minimal changes and can even survive without a fuel pump...

I suggest you buy a few books on turbocharging and perform many hours of internet searching and reading up on the subject... you're going to have to learn a hell of a lot more than we can tell you here in a few posts.
 
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