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Does changing out either front or rear spockets a good upgrade or a waste of time and money? If it is a good mod, which one should be changed and what teeth count? Mine are stock now. I just installed the CT system and jetted. Any ideas would be great.


Don
 

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it all depends on what your looking for. for more top speed you want a larger front spocket, or a smaller back(or a combo). for more torque you want just the opposite, smaller front sprocket and larger rear. the stock setup is 13 teeth on the front and 40 on the rear. it so happends i did the math on some diffrent setups. say you wanted more tourqe and you dropped a tooth in the front, that would give you a 7.6% increase. on the other hand if you kept the front stock and changed the rear 1 tooth larger, that would only equate to a 2.4% increase. what i did was dropped a thooth in the front and gained a rear in the back for a 10.1% increase. which made a HUGE diffrence. i can ride weelies all day long, but my top speed isnt as fast. hope this helped
 

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Ditto.

Depending what type of riding you do, the front sprocket is one of the least expensive mods you can make. If it was me, I would start by adding a tooth up front. The Raptor has a bunch of torque, and it's almost too much. Even adding a tooth, the front end still has no problem getting skyward. Not to mention, you gain a bit in mid-range where it seems I ride the most.

~Brian
 

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The 13-40 set-up in my opinion is the best all-around gearing for a just a piped raptor with 20" tires in the rear.

Get a 12 and 14 tooth front sprocket as well, everyone has different opinions on what gearing they like the most, and truthfully by testing them out for yourself first hand, will YOU be able to choose which one you like best.
The front sprockets are only 10-$15 a piece, plus after you have a 12, 13, 14 tooth you don't have to stick with one,..you can change it over depending on what kind of terrain you'll be riding, ect.

Ater your use to messing with the front sprocket gearing you can fine tune the gearing you like most with the rear sprocket.
 

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eventually you have to replace them anyway. you can buy chain kits with both sprockets and a chain. this is the best way to go. usually i buy a second countershaft sprocket when i buy a kit. they do tend to wear out sooner than the rear.
 
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