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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, just joined the forum. Look forward to the advice and answers. Just picked up a new 2020 raptor se. red and grey. Just ordered lone star +2 +1 a-arms and a adjustable lone star axcalibur rear axle from +1-+4. Should be arriving soon. Was looking for some advice on what to build to make the quad race ready. Appreciate all the input. Thanks again. Stock everything besides the a-arms, axle, nerf bars, and hand guards
 

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The suspension Needs to set for your body weight.
Shocks also need set specifically for wider A-arms.
Proper handling beats extra power any day!!!
A bigger oil tank will cool the oil a few degrees too, which helps engine life, and power in races.
Aftermarket grips, and aftermarket levers adjusted to preference if you dislike stock...control is everything.
Stainless steel brake lines improve brake "feel". They won't stop you any sooner, but will keep the lever off the bar, and eliminate the "spongey" feel, especially on hot days.
Steering dampners can be bandaids, but can also reduce arm pump when set right.
Good skid plates if you're in the woods, and they don't hurt on a MX track either, as there's always baseball size rocks waiting to ruin your day.
Save any hp mods til last.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the response six pack. I have the piggyback shocks on it. Haven’t done anything in terms of that. Where would be a place to have something like that done? Do you send them in or could a local dealership do it. I work away from quad so can only work on it every other weekend for a few more months. I know you can set sag and all that which I believe your referring to on suspension, but what about the shocks. I was gonna go to the track once I get arms and axle on and start doing some testing with the shocks. Preload, etc. any recommendations or settings for my size? I’m 5’7” 185 pounds. I was thinking about skid plates. Couple things I’ve noticed on sharp turns the bike likes to get on 2, which is why I ordered the arms and axle. I do bottom out on decent size jumps just barely, like I said still stock tho, something I could tune myself? Or send in? I’m learning the ropes and appreciate it
 

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I may be getting older, but I refuse to grow up!
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A lot of the forum members send shocks to JOGACA on the forum. He, Kevin, rebuilds, revalves and resprings as needed to YOU, and your intended use with riding style, a-arms and weight. All at a very reasonable price. It's not like everyone gets the same thing

I don't have his number handy but someone will chime in.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the response. I thought you could adjust both suspension and shocks without revalving if you were within weight limits. I was gonna mess with the suspension and the sag and the shocks with the reservoirs. Is it imminent to send the shocks in? Or could I tune them myself?
 

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You asked where to be worked on, I responded.

Yes, you can adjust them yourself, but you're already bottoming out. Add wider aarms you add more leverage. The arms need to work with stock length shocks or you'll need longer shocks. Either way, the shocks will probly need something to be optimized for you. You can call Kevin, 480-262-3216, and get his point of view. He's easy to talk to and no purchase is necessary unless you want to.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
They work with my shocks already on. No long travel or anything. And I know I’m bottoming our I also haven’t adjusted anything on the shocks it’s factory settings. So I was asking if I played around with it could I get it any better or is sending to someone necessary. And ok thanks
 

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Yes, you can adjust your stock shocks, and likely improve the ride as is.
Rebound, compression, and preload, and only change one at a time.
Since you've never done it, you should watch some youtube videos, the visual will help you to better understand what and why you're making the adjustments.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
alright I figured they needed to be tuned for my weight and riding style. I just was curious if I could still rip it without having to send the shocks out. I know doing it one at a time I stayed up the pst few nights watching videos. Need to set sag and then they they had certain things you can do to test the different options till you find what’s best. I plan on upgrading to fox evols down the road but not now since I paid the money for the piggy backs. Just wanna get the most bang for what I have. I do plan on watching the videos and being careful. Just didn’t know what sending them off would do compared to me tuning it myself. Sorry for all the questions I appreciate the input
 

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Go fox shocks, they're amazing. Everyone else will recommend getting the stock no name shocks rebuilt by some guy on Facebook, sounds scary to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Go fox shocks, they're amazing. Everyone else will recommend getting the stock no name shocks rebuilt by some guy on Facebook, sounds scary to me.
I just wanna get some use out of my piggybacks since I got them the bike is like 2 months old and has 10 hours. I wanna tune the shocks to work for right now and then use them till I think I’m ready for the evols but that’s for sure the route I was going. I just wanted to know if tuning my piggyback suspension would be possible just myself at the track making changes one at a time.
 

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The piggy back stock shocks are a name brand and have great potential. They need to be tuned, sprung and possible valved for your weight and type of type of riding. It all depends on a person's budget.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The piggy back stock shocks are a name brand and have great potential. They need to be tuned, sprung and possible valved for your weight and type of type of riding. It all depends on a person's budget.
When you say tuned and sprung is that something I can do myself or do I need to send them in? I was under the impression I set sag and tune the shocks I should be fine because I’m under the max weight limit I’m 185 pounds I believe the max is 220
 

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You should be able to get proper sag and good performance from stock shocks.
You are correct about the weight range and your weight.
Different springs and valving would be a need if you were a flyweight or a heavyweight, but at 185, your stock remote resivoir shocks can be set to handle very well.
The goal is to make the shocks absorb the bumps, snap back to laden position as quickly as possible(laden sag, your weight on the bike), without upsetting the seat.
As in, no pogo stick type transfer, like driving over a basketball and the whole bike(seat height for example) raises the same amount as the obstacle. But instead, the shock to compress over the obstacle, while transferring as little up/down motion into the frame.
All 3 settings are as they sound
Preload, affects height and overall firmness/softness, you're pre loading the springs.
Compression, you're compressing the springs, how much do they compress, and how soft or firm.
Rebound, how quickly does the shock return or rebound to laden position.
An extra set of hands, or someone Your weight on the seat while you measure and adjust is a big help.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You should be able to get proper sag and good performance from stock shocks.
You are correct about the weight range and your weight.
Different springs and valving would be a need if you were a flyweight or a heavyweight, but at 185, your stock remote resivoir shocks can be set to handle very well.
The goal is to make the shocks absorb the bumps, snap back to laden position as quickly as possible(laden sag, your weight on the bike), without upsetting the seat.
As in, no pogo stick type transfer, like driving over a basketball and the whole bike(seat height for example) raises the same amount as the obstacle. But instead, the shock to compress over the obstacle, while transferring as little up/down motion into the frame.
All 3 settings are as they sound
Preload, affects height and overall firmness/softness, you're pre loading the springs.
Compression, you're compressing the springs, how much do they compress, and how soft or firm.
Rebound, how quickly does the shock return or rebound to laden position.
An extra set of hands, or someone Your weight on the seat while you measure and adjust is a big help.
Alright I appreciate that very much. They said you can test each setting individually whether it’s on jumps or whoops. Do you recommend starting at a certain setting like all the way soft or hard and working my way from there one adjustment at a time? I’ve read quite a bit on it and hoping I can figure it out myself. Sounds pretty simple just takes time and patience. Do I need a special tool to adjust anything? Sorry I’m just not with my bike I work down in the keys and not with it often. After adjusting suspension and shocks. What would be the next step? The a arms and axle are on order waiting for them to come in and install them before I make any changes on anything. Since it would be completely different. What else could I do as far as control? Wheels, tires? Any kind of stabilizers? Or should I be pretty well set and start looking into full exhaust kits with the pc5?
 

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Alright I appreciate that very much. They said you can test each setting individually whether it’s on jumps or whoops. Do you recommend starting at a certain setting like all the way soft or hard and working my way from there one adjustment at a time? I’ve read quite a bit on it and hoping I can figure it out myself. Sounds pretty simple just takes time and patience. Do I need a special tool to adjust anything? Sorry I’m just not with my bike I work down in the keys and not with it often. After adjusting suspension and shocks. What would be the next step? The a arms and axle are on order waiting for them to come in and install them before I make any changes on anything. Since it would be completely different. What else could I do as far as control? Wheels, tires? Any kind of stabilizers? Or should I be pretty well set and start looking into full exhaust kits with the pc5?
Yes, start your compression and rebound(one or the other) and turn it fully clockwise/soft, now go for a short ride, it should be noticebly bad.
Now turn it fully counter clockwise and go for a ride. It should feel completely different...and still bad.
I say that to give you an idea of what you changed and the effect it caused.
You need to count the rotations of the adjustment when you make them, say compression, 3 1/2 turns from fully cc(counter clockwise).
Some adjusters click every half or full turn, some do not, and it doesn't matter either way. Never force them either.
For preload, the rear for example, you'll need a spanner wrench to loosen the lock rings above the spring.
If you had 30 threads visible above the upper lock ring(a ridiculous amount) then that spring would be so "pre loaded" it's range and ability to absorb bumps would be insignificant.
But say you have 3 threads visible above the upper lock ring, now it's not as preloaded, and has a nice range of motion.
Maybe 3 threads is too soft, and you need 5, it's trial and error until the light bulb comes on(no offense meant).
Set preload at 3 threads.
Set compression 3 to 4 turns cc.
Set rebound 3 to 4 turns cc.
Do this After setting and riding each fully soft and fully firm, again, to give you an idea of what's happening.
Once you've done this, and have them set middle to firm(and the rear spring will probabaly have a ballpark of 20 turns cc of adjustment vs the front shocks' 4 to 5), then push down fast and hard on the front bumper, and then rear grab bar.
You want the suspension to Compress without more effort than what your body weight would put on it, without bottoming out, and Rebound quickly, and without having a sloppy return or a lazy double bounce as it settles back to laden, without the springs being Preloaded too much too be to firm to work, or so soft that they feel sloppy.
Measuring sag gets you in the ballpark range, but then requires riding and small adjustments to dial in. This will also vary by terrain, say a smooth track with lots of small whoops, vs a rough rutted out track with bigger jumps.
Once you figure it out, you'll be able to really dial it in, and adjust on the fly, in turn, making you a faster rider from having better handling and more confidence in your machine.
 

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Turning the clickers makes a big improvement. Turn the rear shock rebound all the way in and push down on the rear grab bar, then turn the clicker out to full soft and push the grab bar again. You can do this real fast and see how much the clickers do work! I weigh 130 lbs in shorts, so I got a softer triple spring for the front. At some point in tuning for comfort, you can sacrifice handling. Too soft in the front and you get excess body roll. Each person has their own preferences in suspension settings.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
A
Yes, start your compression and rebound(one or the other) and turn it fully clockwise/soft, now go for a short ride, it should be noticebly bad.
Now turn it fully counter clockwise and go for a ride. It should feel completely different...and still bad.
I say that to give you an idea of what you changed and the effect it caused.
You need to count the rotations of the adjustment when you make them, say compression, 3 1/2 turns from fully cc(counter clockwise).
Some adjusters click every half or full turn, some do not, and it doesn't matter either way. Never force them either.
For preload, the rear for example, you'll need a spanner wrench to loosen the lock rings above the spring.
If you had 30 threads visible above the upper lock ring(a ridiculous amount) then that spring would be so "pre loaded" it's range and ability to absorb bumps would be insignificant.
But say you have 3 threads visible above the upper lock ring, now it's not as preloaded, and has a nice range of motion.
Maybe 3 threads is too soft, and you need 5, it's trial and error until the light bulb comes on(no offense meant).
Set preload at 3 threads.
Set compression 3 to 4 turns cc.
Set rebound 3 to 4 turns cc.
Do this After setting and riding each fully soft and fully firm, again, to give you an idea of what's happening.
Once you've done this, and have them set middle to firm(and the rear spring will probabaly have a ballpark of 20 turns cc of adjustment vs the front shocks' 4 to 5), then push down fast and hard on the front bumper, and then rear grab bar.
You want the suspension to Compress without more effort than what your body weight would put on it, without bottoming out, and Rebound quickly, and without having a sloppy return or a lazy double bounce as it settles back to laden, without the springs being Preloaded too much too be to firm to work, or so soft that they feel sloppy.
Measuring sag gets you in the ballpark range, but then requires riding and small adjustments to dial in. This will also vary by terrain, say a smooth track with lots of small whoops, vs a rough rutted out track with bigger jumps.
Once you figure it out, you'll be able to really dial it in, and adjust on the fly, in turn, making you a faster rider from having better handling and more confidence in your machine.
Awesome thank you. When you have those stock settings at 20cc and the front 4-5cc. You want me to tighten all the way clockwise then back out those turns. Correct? And then I can kind of go from there. I’ll have to check the threads on the back. And yeah I wasn’t sure if I needed a wrench or if I could use channelocks. Is there a tool to do the reservoir?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Turning the clickers makes a big improvement. Turn the rear shock rebound all the way in and push down on the rear grab bar, then turn the clicker out to full soft and push the grab bar again. You can do this real fast and see how much the clickers do work! I weigh 130 lbs in shorts, so I got a softer triple spring for the front. At some point in tuning for comfort, you can sacrifice handling. Too soft in the front and you get excess body roll. Each person has their own preferences in suspension settings.
Thank you. I guess my best bet is to just go out and do some riding and find what works best I guess if I’m correct
 

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I may be getting older, but I refuse to grow up!
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Yes, you can try adjusting your shocks for your weight and bike set up. it may work reasonably well. No one is taking in consideration that you have +2 +1 a-arms. That increases leverage on the front shocks with +2 each. BUT, it also changes the rear balance slightly because the bike is 1in longer.

As far as "No name shocks on FB", it isn't scary at all. Kevin, aka JOGACA, has been building shocks for recreational riders, racers and even members from this Raptor Forum since before I joined. I have never seen any bad reviews or complaints about him, his prices or his work. Just the opposite. His shocks are dialed in to perfection and need very little to no additional changes when received back, and for a very reasonable price. Search back on the forum and you'll find reviews that compare his reworked shocks to be equal or in some cases better then the high dollar shocks. Those of us that have his shocks know how good they are. Those who don't are just blowing smoke and getting you to spend more money.

Call him and talk to him for his recommendations to your factory shocks. It's free to talk and he won't sell you anything if you don't want.
 
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