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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi.
I have just bought myself a 2012 250 Raptor, and would really appreciate some guidance.
I bought it used from a dealership, but didn't get to test ride it as it was missing it's license plates at the time.
When I finally got them and tested the Raptor on the road, it felt like there was a problem with it.
I can't even drive 20 mph before the steering becomes very sensitive and it feels like it just wants to throw itself of the road. I tried to play with the tire pressures, but to no avail. It barely made any difference.
Looking over the suspension, everything seems fine. Nothing looks bent or out of order.

One of the problems I have is my lack of experience with ATV's, so I have no way of knowing if it's supposed to be this way. I called the dealership, and they said ATV's in general isn't as stable as the motorcycle I usually ride (Honda CBF600), so I just have to get used to it.
Can this really be right though? Surely it should be possible to drive faster than 30 mph without thinking I might end up in the grill of the next car coming towards me.
 

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Hmm, doesn’t seem right. Can you place it on blocks, spin the front tires to see if there is any wobble to the wheel? You can do the same with the rears, while on blocks you can put it in gear and let the wheels rotate under power.

Disclaimer….do this at your own risk and use common sense safety. I do it in a garage with nothing in front of it in the event it comes off.
 
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WIth a solid rear axle it's not going to drive very nice on pavement. They get very twitchy very quickly if you are not used to them. If you are old and big enough to ride a Cbf you are too big for a 250.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hmm, doesn’t seem right. Can you place it on blocks, spin the front tires to see if there is any wobble to the wheel? You can do the same with the rears, while on blocks you can put it in gear and let the wheels rotate under power.

Disclaimer….do this at your own risk and use common sense safety. I do it in a garage with nothing in front of it in the event it comes off.
Okay. I will try this ASAP. Thanks for the good tips!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
WIth a solid rear axle it's not going to drive very nice on pavement. They get very twitchy very quickly if you are not used to them. If you are old and big enough to ride a Cbf you are too big for a 250.
Yeah, but it's more than just "not very nice". It feels dangerous. The size issue is somewhat valid i guess, but I'm not a big person. In fact, I weigh just 55 kg (110-ish pounds).
 

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I would adjust the toe of the front tires. Just a little adjustment in or out can make a huge difference. I would guess you are toe out, where the rear of the tires are closer than the fronts. You actually want to be just slightly toe in, where the front of the tires are closer than the rears, for the most stable ride. It is a quick easy adjustment, just loosen the lock nuts on the tie rods and spin the rod. One direction makes the front turn in the other direction makes the rear turn in. There is a indentation on the tie rod for a wrench to fit. I don't worry about perfect alignment but if you want to go the extra mile you can run a straight line from the rear wheels. I always just figure if my handle bars are straight when I'm going straight that is good enough for me.


 
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