Raptor Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No valve cover gasket is used. Yamabond is what is used to seal it.
LOL! I've been trying to find one for a while now. Will RTV work in place of Yamabond?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,002 Posts
I have used some black RTV a few times. You can get the right stuff at a autoparts store no need for Yamabond. I can't recall what your supposed to use but mine was black:lol: Just don't use to much you only need just enough to seal it. I got a 660 head that got trashed because they used to much RTV on it. Plugged a oil hole in the came and ruined the journal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
LOL! I've been trying to find one for a while now. Will RTV work in place of Yamabond?
Or go to any bike shop & get some ThreeBond semi drying liquid sealer. Its just like Yamabond...You can also go to a Yamaha dealer & get some Yamabond...But like Dog86 said.."dont use to much" or your gona have problems down the road..
Good luck.
 

·
Master of the Electron
Joined
·
15,520 Posts
Problem with RTV is that excess inside the head cover can crumble, and bits get into small oil passages causing big problems.
 

·
I am unique
Joined
·
22,621 Posts
Problem with RTV is that excess inside the head cover can crumble, and bits get into small oil passages causing big problems.
+1........Yamabond adheres to the edges whereas RTV will shear off and eventually plug the oil sump. ...........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Has anyone used this before? It's not all stringy and messy, it's very easy to use, it doesn't set up until it's compressed between the cases, the excess wipes or washes away, No clumps of it get into the oil pump screens, and it's available at any parts store. I hear works far better than any of the yamabonds or 3 bond, or any of those types. It doesn't firm up until it gets compressed between the cases (when the air is taken away) so there is no rush to get it together in any specific time period or anything. You can apply it, come back a week or even a month later, and assemble it, and it'll work the same. Another advantage is if you use too much, the excess washes away in the engine oil, and won't plug oil pumps like the others can. On the outside, the excess can just be wiped away.
 

Attachments

·
Master of the Electron
Joined
·
15,520 Posts
Haven't used it, but it sounds like good stuff.

For those that haven't seen this it before -

"Permatex® Anaerobic Gasket Maker

OEM specified. Noncorrosive gasketing material designed primarily for use on aluminum, iron, and steel flanged mating surfaces. Ideal for on-the-spot and emergency repairs, or when a conventional gasket is unavailable. Fills gaps up to .015" and cures to a solvent-resistant seal that will not tear or decay during service. Parts disassemble easily even after extended service and old gasket material can be removed in minutes with a simple putty knife.

Suggested Applications: Water pumps, thermostat housings, transmission pans, transmission case covers, transaxle casings, o-ring replacement"

I think I'll try this stuff.
 

·
I am unique
Joined
·
22,621 Posts
Haven't used it, but it sounds like good stuff.

For those that haven't seen this stuff -

"Permatex® Anaerobic Gasket Maker

OEM specified. Noncorrosive gasketing material designed primarily for use on aluminum, iron, and steel flanged mating surfaces. Ideal for on-the-spot and emergency repairs, or when a conventional gasket is unavailable. Fills gaps up to .015" and cures to a solvent-resistant seal that will not tear or decay during service. Parts disassemble easily even after extended service and old gasket material can be removed in minutes with a simple putty knife.

Suggested Applications: Water pumps, thermostat housings, transmission pans, transmission case covers, transaxle casings, o-ring replacement"

I think I'll try this stuff.
I wouldn't use it on this application. This is pretty heavy duty stuff that I see mainly on transmission flanges and huge cast iron oil pans i have used it and once it bonds you need crowbars and sledges to get it apart. Your choice though..............
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,836 Posts
I am sure if Yamaha felt the anerobic sealer was supiror for this application then that is what the manual would specify to use.

So I will continue to use Yamabond 4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am sure if Yamaha felt the anerobic sealer was supiror for this application then that is what the manual would specify to use.

So I will continue to use Yamabond 4.
Thats fine. But sometimes there are better products out there compared to OEM. There are better motor oils out there than Yamalube. To each his own.
 

·
Master of the Electron
Joined
·
15,520 Posts
I am sure if Yamaha felt the anerobic sealer was supiror for this application then that is what the manual would specify to use.

So I will continue to use Yamabond 4.
I don't know for sure about THIS particular material... but some things just didn't EXIST when the Raptor engine was designed - doesn't mean they wouldn't use it now if they could.

Also doesn't mean you should change - but others can use their own logic and common sense when deciding.

But also, Willy's experience would suggest otherwise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,836 Posts
With the cam cover the sealer plays in to the clearance between the cam journals, and head. So by using something that is thicker or thinner than YamaBond 4 you could / are changing the bearing clearance. It isnt like it is an oil pan or valve covers on a chevy 350.
 

·
I am unique
Joined
·
22,621 Posts
I don't know for sure about THIS particular material... but some things just didn't EXIST when the Raptor engine was designed - doesn't mean they wouldn't use it now if they could.

Also doesn't mean you should change - but others can use their own logic and common sense when deciding.

But also, Willy's experience would suggest otherwise.
There are some good points to the anaerobic sealant, it is very easy to clean off, it sort of peels off like a skin when cleaning it when you dismantle it, you can use a very sharp gasket scraper or razor blade and the seal is excellent..............

BUT the stuff that oozes from the flange you are sealing is the problem, on the exterior it isn't a problem but on the interior this stuff turns to a rock hard substances that breaks off and contaminates oil filters and gets caught between gears.

CASE Equipment uses this stuff when they sealed there tractor transmission back in the 80s and you talk about a mean ordeal to even remove covers and oil pans, I remember one occasion when I was removing a transfer box from under a 250hp farm tractor, it was sealed with this stuff and I had jacks pushing on it with wedges in between anything possible to try to remove this transfer box, in the end I had to pick a solid location to hit it a sledge hammer, and it took a few solid hits to break this box off.

I have used this stuff lots over the years but in areas where you need a good seal with huge flanges that are under tremendous stress. Case uses more of what looks like the Yamabond sealant now on there newer tractors, even GM sells what looks like yamabond to seal there valve covers on the Duramax diesels.

Another thing that would concern me is if this anaerobic sealant is compatible with aluminum since I have never seen it used on new equipment where aluminum is involved .........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
With the cam cover the sealer plays in to the clearance between the cam journals, and head. So by using something that is thicker or thinner than YamaBond 4 you could / are changing the bearing clearance. It isnt like it is an oil pan or valve covers on a chevy 350.
I didn't know that. I haven't got that far into the engine rebuild yet to notice and inspect. Good point! But if Yamaha based its cam tolerances, bearing clearances, etc on a sealant bead that can be a variable (depending on who's applying it), that doesn't sound like very good R&D work on Yamaha's part.

By no means am I trying to say don't use yamabond, etc. Just wanted to give another option for everyone. And I've heard from great engine builders that this other sealer works fantastic, and they claim they will never go back to the company sponsored products like yamabond.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,406 Posts
I didn't know that. I haven't got that far into the engine rebuild yet to notice and inspect. Good point! But if Yamaha based its cam tolerances, bearing clearances, etc on a sealant bead that can be a variable (depending on who's applying it), that doesn't sound like very good R&D work on Yamaha's part.

By no means am I trying to say don't use yamabond, etc. Just wanted to give another option for everyone. And I've heard from great engine builders that this other sealer works fantastic, and they claim they will never go back to the company sponsored products like yamabond.
I gave you another option in a previous post... ThreeBond, avalible at most bike shops. Its a semi drying liquid sealer just like Yamabond..
Whatever you use just be carfull..;)
 

·
I am unique
Joined
·
22,621 Posts
I didn't know that. I haven't got that far into the engine rebuild yet to notice and inspect. Good point! But if Yamaha based its cam tolerances, bearing clearances, etc on a sealant bead that can be a variable (depending on who's applying it), that doesn't sound like very good R&D work on Yamaha's part.

By no means am I trying to say don't use yamabond, etc. Just wanted to give another option for everyone. And I've heard from great engine builders that this other sealer works fantastic, and they claim they will never go back to the company sponsored products like yamabond.
You can put Yamabond on as thick as you want but when you torque down the valve cover or engine cases all the Yamabond gets pushed out except what fills scratches and voids, I have tried measuring the thickness of it with micrometers and it is basically unmeasureable whereas the anerobic sealant is, like I said previously, when you scrape the anerobic sealant off upon dismantling, it is like a layer of skin.............

As far as Yamahas tolerances, they are made upon manufacturing and using there suggestions as a sealant leaves no room for error since the way this sealant works, it basically all squeezes out and just seals the flange...............

Problems arise when you deviate from this sealants intended use like allowing it to dry first or using it in excessive amounts, you need a clean surface first and use it sparingly, I even use a gasket scraper to smear it over the entire surface so that there is basically nothing left when I put the covers on................

I would like to know who these great engine builders are................
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I gave you another option in a previous post... ThreeBond, avalible at most bike shops. Its a semi drying liquid sealer just like Yamabond..
Whatever you use just be carfull..;)
Ya, I seen that. Noted! Thanks bud.;)
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top