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Hey guys.....Not sure if this is the right area to post this or not...if any problem please more .


I have new rims on the way soo while I have all the wheels and all the good stuff off i`m just wondering if it`s worth putting on new break pads and all new bearings in the front wheels and for the rear wheels. My raptor is a 2007... Now I been watching a video on youtube of a guy doing his bearings on a z400 and he said the wheels should be shaky when the bike is rocked....I don`t have anything like that and no squeaking ..but i`m just wondering where the quad is 4 years old now is it just as well to do it then later the summer? I know this is a more hard question to ask as it is personal opinion but it`s not to have a 2nd thought from someone else.

I know when I have the front lifted I cant spin the wheels freely and they just stop is that normal or is it due to the bearings or the break pads just touching off the front rotors?

Any thoughts or ideas would be great !


This is the video I watched.....is it pretty much the same way for take the bearings out and put back in ?

 

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I know when I have the front lifted I cant spin the wheels freely and they just stop is that normal or is it due to the bearings or the break pads just touching off the front rotors?


The front wheels should spin pretty easy. Since you have the wheels off, you could definitely check the pads/rotors to make sure they are within specs. It also depends where you ride. I rode in the silt mud before and it destroyed my rear bearings, the front ones survived just fine though. I would say it doesn’t hurt to take a closer look at the bearings, right now maybe pop a set of the front ones out and inspect them.
 

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It's pretty easy to actually have a look at the front bearings. Just remove the caliper, take out the split pin and remove the hub nut. The hub will then pull off. You can then remove the collars that fit in the seals and take a look at the bearings.

Spinning the wheels isn't really a great way of checking them. often a bearing that is on it's way out may spin more freely than one that's ok as the greese may have escaped.

As for the rears. They tend to fail more often than the fronts especially if you ride mud and water. Best to take the axle out and check 'em. You can then grease the seals if anything which should help them last a bit longer. I've fitted a grease zerk to my rear bearing carrier as 'sealed for life' bearings aren't up to keeping mud a water out for long. The main reason the rears don't last long is that the seals dry out, wear out, and then let water in in no time at all.

Ez
 

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It's pretty easy to actually have a look at the front bearings. Just remove the caliper, take out the split pin and remove the hub nut. The hub will then pull off. You can then remove the collars that fit in the seals and take a look at the bearings.

Spinning the wheels isn't really a great way of checking them. often a bearing that is on it's way out may spin more freely than one that's ok as the greese may have escaped.

As for the rears. They tend to fail more often than the fronts especially if you ride mud and water. Best to take the axle out and check 'em. You can then grease the seals if anything which should help them last a bit longer. I've fitted a grease zerk to my rear bearing carrier as 'sealed for life' bearings aren't up to keeping mud a water out for long. The main reason the rears don't last long is that the seals dry out, wear out, and then let water in in no time at all.

Ez
Do you have a picture of where you put the zerk fitting. I assume you just drilled and tapped a hole, however curious on the positioning of it, Thanks
 

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Do you have a picture of where you put the zerk fitting. I assume you just drilled and tapped a hole, however curious on the positioning of it, Thanks
I drilled from the sproket end through into the void between the bearings. There is a write up on here somewhere and a picture but I can't find it now. it's a great mod, my rear bearings have lasted twice as long as they did originally and still going. Mainly cos as you pump the grease it it lubes the seals up.
 
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