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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
If anyone has tips, tricks, suggestions or wants to let me know I write too much....lemme hear it!

So I've had my Raptor for about 2 weeks now, and I've had 3 days of focused wheelie practice. Today was an absolute leap though, I rode a standing wheelie using brake, clutch and throttle across our entire arena, which means the wheelie was about 130 yards. No question the best one.

Current Primary Goal: Finding the balance point on command.

Current Secondary Goal(s): clutch throttle modulation


Things I've learned:

  • Dirt wheelies and pavement wheelies are completely different with regard to technique
  • Sitting and standing wheelies are are fairly different with respect to balance point and should be worked separately if you're a novice (like me).
  • Clutch lever ergonomics are important both for being able to consistently pull the front end up, and absorbing the drop when you put it down.
  • For small to medium handed guys an aftermarket clutch lever is necessary if maximum performance is sought
  • Never under any circumstances come down with the wheels pointed any other direction than perfectly, dead ass, straight ahead.
Pavement Wheelies

Rev and pop, bend arms as bike comes up. To an observer it may look like you're pulling the bike up but I'm not. Since I don't have any aftermarket goodies yet, I can't say exactly what the RPM range is but I can hear it. The clutch comes out the moment it becomes a singular uninterrupted tone, or the moment the braps run together. Catching them (wheelies) where they can be further adjusted (near the balance point) can be tedious because your butt is lying to you about the balance point and will tell you to come out of the throttle early. Even when you get that weird feeling in your stomach, you're still a few degrees out. What I did to kind of cement the position in my mind was pick the bike up an balance it, try to burn in what everything looked like.

Dirt Wheelies

You cannot rev and pop..... I would imagine in some good east Texas sod the margin of error for throttle and clutch is greater, but out in this loose sandy soil (and these tires) you have to get the whole song and dance right or you just spin, and spin is the enemy. It's a burned attempt and can alter trajectory which brings me to another one....if you're practicing next to fence, give yourself a few couple yards of berth. You'd be surprised (or I was) at just how much uneven wheel spin can skew your direction.

So I've found dirt wheelies are easiest standing, this is my checklist for the standing dirt wheelie

- anchor right foot with toe on brake
- anchor left foot on grab bar, put knee on seat
- throw all weight into back foot while simultaneously easing clutch out quickly and using throttle like a surgeon wields a scalpel. Do not pop the clutch here, release it rapidly but controlled.

When done right it bogs a little bit and the front end comes straight up with no drama. Start slow as the balance point is different here. If you over rotate, hit the rear brake, if you're too late, just step off, the bike will balance on the grab bar. Don't be an asshole, if you get sendy you will 100% flip all four hundred and something pounds of that bike right over on top of yourself. It's a bug, not a feature. The grab bar isn't a fail safe so don't treat it as such.


Clutch Ergo's (front brake too)

After this last day of practice, both wrists hurt, and I realized that both the front brake and clutch were riding high, so the angle on impact was severe. Like the difference between doing a pushup on your hands with your palms down vs doing them on your knuckles or on paralletes. By lowering both slightly, it makes coming down much more comfortable. The last thing is that if you're a small to medium handed rider, an adjustable clutch lever might be the heat. I can just barely get 2 fingers around the clutch but I can tell you, after a tank of wheelie practice, my left hand was smoked. A lever closer to the handle, and easier to pull would be (and will be, its already on the way) awesome.



low speed vs hi speed wheelies

So I've played around briefly with hi speed (hi speed to me, 2nd and 3rd, I know some of you monsters are pulling them up in 4 and 5, yall are crazy) wheelies and it seems to me there's a direct and obvious trade off.

Low speed wheelies come up fast, making it a little bit harder to nail the balance point but the consequences of a mistake are low. You just hop off and the bike balances on the grab bar or you come right down....

Hi speed wheelies come up slow, making it easier to judge where you are with respect the BP, but the consequences of a mistake are much higher. I don't know about you but I'm trying to never find out what dirt or pavement feels like in any gear that doesn't start with 1.


Lastly, some random thoughts....I looked for a grab bar that had a dedicated foot spot, couldn't find one...has anyone made one?

I also thought it might be cool to have a grab bar that was really beefy so that it could serve as a long term but still sacrificial part? Mine has only seen the ground a handful of times but it doesn't look like it's gonna take but another handful before I'll have to replace it. In the event that I a.) find the time and b.) churn a couple out, is that something anyone else would be interested in?

Definitely wouldn't be the kind of thing I'd be looking to make money on, just reimbursement for materials, shipping that kind of thing.


Let me know what you guys think and be safe out there!

-Alamo
 

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Google prm desert grab bar. I have one on mine and I am sure your standing wheelies would benefit there. Good write up.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Google prm desert grab bar. I have one on mine and I am sure your standing wheelies would benefit there. Good write up.
YES! appreciated!
 

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If anyone has tips, tricks, suggestions or wants to let me know I write too much....lemme hear it!


After this last day of practice, both wrists hurt, and I realized that both the front brake and clutch were riding high, so the angle on impact was severe.

-Alamo
You write too much. HA!

Heres a litttle trick i learned on streetbikes, try getting back on the gas as the front comes down. When you get the technique down you can set it down like a feather. Easier on your wrists, and your shocks

Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk
 

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Whut up alamo, ive also been trying to practice wheelies in my 05 raptor 660, ive gotten pretty good at holding the wheelie but ive noticed my raptor always veers to the right. I always have to run my left rear tire really low to even start to go straight. Is It common to have competely different rear tire pressures to wheelie straight? Is there any other way to adjust this?? Just curious because i put brand new street tires on the rappy and again im having to run the left rear at a signifigantly lower pressure difference than the right
 

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If anyone has tips, tricks, suggestions or wants to let me know I write too much....lemme hear it!

So I've had my Raptor for about 2 weeks now, and I've had 3 days of focused wheelie practice. Today was an absolute leap though, I rode a standing wheelie using brake, clutch and throttle across our entire arena, which means the wheelie was about 130 yards. No question the best one.

Current Primary Goal: Finding the balance point on command.

Current Secondary Goal(s): clutch throttle modulation


Things I've learned:

  • Dirt wheelies and pavement wheelies are completely different with regard to technique
  • Sitting and standing wheelies are are fairly different with respect to balance point and should be worked separately if you're a novice (like me).
  • Clutch lever ergonomics are important both for being able to consistently pull the front end up, and absorbing the drop when you put it down.
  • For small to medium handed guys an aftermarket clutch lever is necessary if maximum performance is sought
  • Never under any circumstances come down with the wheels pointed any other direction than perfectly, dead ass, straight ahead.
Pavement Wheelies

Rev and pop, bend arms as bike comes up. To an observer it may look like you're pulling the bike up but I'm not. Since I don't have any aftermarket goodies yet, I can't say exactly what the RPM range is but I can hear it. The clutch comes out the moment it becomes a singular uninterrupted tone, or the moment the braps run together. Catching them (wheelies) where they can be further adjusted (near the balance point) can be tedious because your butt is lying to you about the balance point and will tell you to come out of the throttle early. Even when you get that weird feeling in your stomach, you're still a few degrees out. What I did to kind of cement the position in my mind was pick the bike up an balance it, try to burn in what everything looked like.

Dirt Wheelies

You cannot rev and pop..... I would imagine in some good east Texas sod the margin of error for throttle and clutch is greater, but out in this loose sandy soil (and these tires) you have to get the whole song and dance right or you just spin, and spin is the enemy. It's a burned attempt and can alter trajectory which brings me to another one....if you're practicing next to fence, give yourself a few couple yards of berth. You'd be surprised (or I was) at just
If anyone has tips, tricks, suggestions or wants to let me know I write too much....lemme hear it!

So I've had my Raptor for about 2 weeks now, and I've had 3 days of focused wheelie practice. Today was an absolute leap though, I rode a standing wheelie using brake, clutch and throttle across our entire arena, which means the wheelie was about 130 yards. No question the best one.

Current Primary Goal: Finding the balance point on command.

Current Secondary Goal(s): clutch throttle modulation


Things I've learned:

  • Dirt wheelies and pavement wheelies are completely different with regard to technique
  • Sitting and standing wheelies are are fairly different with respect to balance point and should be worked separately if you're a novice (like me).
  • Clutch lever ergonomics are important both for being able to consistently pull the front end up, and absorbing the drop when you put it down.
  • For small to medium handed guys an aftermarket clutch lever is necessary if maximum performance is sought
  • Never under any circumstances come down with the wheels pointed any other direction than perfectly, dead ass, straight ahead.
Pavement Wheelies

Rev and pop, bend arms as bike comes up. To an observer it may look like you're pulling the bike up but I'm not. Since I don't have any aftermarket goodies yet, I can't say exactly what the RPM range is but I can hear it. The clutch comes out the moment it becomes a singular uninterrupted tone, or the moment the braps run together. Catching them (wheelies) where they can be further adjusted (near the balance point) can be tedious because your butt is lying to you about the balance point and will tell you to come out of the throttle early. Even when you get that weird feeling in your stomach, you're still a few degrees out. What I did to kind of cement the position in my mind was pick the bike up an balance it, try to burn in what everything looked like.

Dirt Wheelies

You cannot rev and pop..... I would imagine in some good east Texas sod the margin of error for throttle and clutch is greater, but out in this loose sandy soil (and these tires) you have to get the whole song and dance right or you just spin, and spin is the enemy. It's a burned attempt and can alter trajectory which brings me to another one....if you're practicing next to fence, give yourself a few couple yards of berth. You'd be surprised (or I was) at just how much uneven wheel spin can skew your direction.

So I've found dirt wheelies are easiest standing, this is my checklist for the standing dirt wheelie

  • anchor right foot with toe on brake
  • anchor left foot on grab bar, put knee on seat
  • throw all weight into back foot while simultaneously easing clutch out quickly and using throttle like a surgeon wields a scalpel. Do not pop the clutch here, release it rapidly but controlled.
When done right it bogs a little bit and the front end comes straight up with no drama. Start slow as the balance point is different here. If you over rotate, hit the rear brake, if you're too late, just step off, the bike will balance on the grab bar. Don't be an asshole, if you get sendy you will 100% flip all four hundred and something pounds of that bike right over on top of yourself. It's a bug, not a feature. The grab bar isn't a fail safe so don't treat it as such.


Clutch Ergo's (front brake too)

After this last day of practice, both wrists hurt, and I realized that both the front brake and clutch were riding high, so the angle on impact was severe. Like the difference between doing a pushup on your hands with your palms down vs doing them on your knuckles or on paralletes. By lowering both slightly, it makes coming down much more comfortable. The last thing is that if you're a small to medium handed rider, an adjustable clutch lever might be the heat. I can just barely get 2 fingers around the clutch but I can tell you, after a tank of wheelie practice, my left hand was smoked. A lever closer to the handle, and easier to pull would be (and will be, its already on the way) awesome.



low speed vs hi speed wheelies

So I've played around briefly with hi speed (hi speed to me, 2nd and 3rd, I know some of you monsters are pulling them up in 4 and 5, yall are crazy) wheelies and it seems to me there's a direct and obvious trade off.

Low speed wheelies come up fast, making it a little bit harder to nail the balance point but the consequences of a mistake are low. You just hop off and the bike balances on the grab bar or you come right down....

Hi speed wheelies come up slow, making it easier to judge where you are with respect the BP, but the consequences of a mistake are much higher. I don't know about you but I'm trying to never find out what dirt or pavement feels like in any gear that doesn't start with 1.


Lastly, some random thoughts....I looked for a grab bar that had a dedicated foot spot, couldn't find one...has anyone made one?

I also thought it might be cool to have a grab bar that was really beefy so that it could serve as a long term but still sacrificial part? Mine has only seen the ground a handful of times but it doesn't look like it's gonna take but another handful before I'll have to replace it. In the event that I a.) find the time and b.) churn a couple out, is that something anyone else would be interested in?

Definitely wouldn't be the kind of thing I'd be looking to make money on, just reimbursement for materials, shipping that kind of thing.


Let me know what you guys think and be safe out there!

-Alamo
how much uneven wheel spin can skew your direction.

So I've found dirt wheelies are easiest standing, this is my checklist for the standing dirt wheelie

  • anchor right foot with toe on brake
  • anchor left foot on grab bar, put knee on seat
  • throw all weight into back foot while simultaneously easing clutch out quickly and using throttle like a surgeon wields a scalpel. Do not pop the clutch here, release it rapidly but controlled.
When done right it bogs a little bit and the front end comes straight up with no drama. Start slow as the balance point is different here. If you over rotate, hit the rear brake, if you're too late, just step off, the bike will balance on the grab bar. Don't be an asshole, if you get sendy you will 100% flip all four hundred and something pounds of that bike right over on top of yourself. It's a bug, not a feature. The grab bar isn't a fail safe so don't treat it as such.


Clutch Ergo's (front brake too)

After this last day of practice, both wrists hurt, and I realized that both the front brake and clutch were riding high, so the angle on impact was severe. Like the difference between doing a pushup on your hands with your palms down vs doing them on your knuckles or on paralletes. By lowering both slightly, it makes coming down much more comfortable. The last thing is that if you're a small to medium handed rider, an adjustable clutch lever might be the heat. I can just barely get 2 fingers around the clutch but I can tell you, after a tank of wheelie practice, my left hand was smoked. A lever closer to the handle, and easier to pull would be (and will be, its already on the way) awesome.



low speed vs hi speed wheelies

So I've played around briefly with hi speed (hi speed to me, 2nd and 3rd, I know some of you monsters are pulling them up in 4 and 5, yall are crazy) wheelies and it seems to me there's a direct and obvious trade off.

Low speed wheelies come up fast, making it a little bit harder to nail the balance point but the consequences of a mistake are low. You just hop off and the bike balances on the grab bar or you come right down....

Hi speed wheelies come up slow, making it easier to judge where you are with respect the BP, but the consequences of a mistake are much higher. I don't know about you but I'm trying to never find out what dirt or pavement feels like in any gear that doesn't start with 1.


Lastly, some random thoughts....I looked for a grab bar that had a dedicated foot spot, couldn't find one...has anyone made one?

I also thought it might be cool to have a grab bar that was really beefy so that it could serve as a long term but still sacrificial part? Mine has only seen the ground a handful of times but it doesn't look like it's gonna take but another handful before I'll have to replace it. In the event that I a.) find the time and b.) churn a couple out, is that something anyone else would be interested in?

Definitely wouldn't be the kind of thing I'd be looking to make money on, just reimbursement for materials, shipping that kind of thing.


Let me know what you guys think and be safe out there!

-Alamo
Ive been burnin through grab bars every month until i found a wheelie bar on ebay that someone made, bought it for about 200 bucks but it was well worth the money
138803
 

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If anyone has tips, tricks, suggestions or wants to let me know I write too much....lemme hear it!

So I've had my Raptor for about 2 weeks now, and I've had 3 days of focused wheelie practice. Today was an absolute leap though, I rode a standing wheelie using brake, clutch and throttle across our entire arena, which means the wheelie was about 130 yards. No question the best one.

Current Primary Goal: Finding the balance point on command.

Current Secondary Goal(s): clutch throttle modulation


Things I've learned:

  • Dirt wheelies and pavement wheelies are completely different with regard to technique
  • Sitting and standing wheelies are are fairly different with respect to balance point and should be worked separately if you're a novice (like me).
  • Clutch lever ergonomics are important both for being able to consistently pull the front end up, and absorbing the drop when you put it down.
  • For small to medium handed guys an aftermarket clutch lever is necessary if maximum performance is sought
  • Never under any circumstances come down with the wheels pointed any other direction than perfectly, dead ass, straight ahead.
Pavement Wheelies

Rev and pop, bend arms as bike comes up. To an observer it may look like you're pulling the bike up but I'm not. Since I don't have any aftermarket goodies yet, I can't say exactly what the RPM range is but I can hear it. The clutch comes out the moment it becomes a singular uninterrupted tone, or the moment the braps run together. Catching them (wheelies) where they can be further adjusted (near the balance point) can be tedious because your butt is lying to you about the balance point and will tell you to come out of the throttle early. Even when you get that weird feeling in your stomach, you're still a few degrees out. What I did to kind of cement the position in my mind was pick the bike up an balance it, try to burn in what everything looked like.

Dirt Wheelies

You cannot rev and pop..... I would imagine in some good east Texas sod the margin of error for throttle and clutch is greater, but out in this loose sandy soil (and these tires) you have to get the whole song and dance right or you just spin, and spin is the enemy. It's a burned attempt and can alter trajectory which brings me to another one....if you're practicing next to fence, give yourself a few couple yards of berth. You'd be surprised (or I was) at just how much uneven wheel spin can skew your direction.

So I've found dirt wheelies are easiest standing, this is my checklist for the standing dirt wheelie

  • anchor right foot with toe on brake
  • anchor left foot on grab bar, put knee on seat
  • throw all weight into back foot while simultaneously easing clutch out quickly and using throttle like a surgeon wields a scalpel. Do not pop the clutch here, release it rapidly but controlled.
When done right it bogs a little bit and the front end comes straight up with no drama. Start slow as the balance point is different here. If you over rotate, hit the rear brake, if you're too late, just step off, the bike will balance on the grab bar. Don't be an asshole, if you get sendy you will 100% flip all four hundred and something pounds of that bike right over on top of yourself. It's a bug, not a feature. The grab bar isn't a fail safe so don't treat it as such.


Clutch Ergo's (front brake too)

After this last day of practice, both wrists hurt, and I realized that both the front brake and clutch were riding high, so the angle on impact was severe. Like the difference between doing a pushup on your hands with your palms down vs doing them on your knuckles or on paralletes. By lowering both slightly, it makes coming down much more comfortable. The last thing is that if you're a small to medium handed rider, an adjustable clutch lever might be the heat. I can just barely get 2 fingers around the clutch but I can tell you, after a tank of wheelie practice, my left hand was smoked. A lever closer to the handle, and easier to pull would be (and will be, its already on the way) awesome.



low speed vs hi speed wheelies

So I've played around briefly with hi speed (hi speed to me, 2nd and 3rd, I know some of you monsters are pulling them up in 4 and 5, yall are crazy) wheelies and it seems to me there's a direct and obvious trade off.

Low speed wheelies come up fast, making it a little bit harder to nail the balance point but the consequences of a mistake are low. You just hop off and the bike balances on the grab bar or you come right down....

Hi speed wheelies come up slow, making it easier to judge where you are with respect the BP, but the consequences of a mistake are much higher. I don't know about you but I'm trying to never find out what dirt or pavement feels like in any gear that doesn't start with 1.


Lastly, some random thoughts....I looked for a grab bar that had a dedicated foot spot, couldn't find one...has anyone made one?

I also thought it might be cool to have a grab bar that was really beefy so that it could serve as a long term but still sacrificial part? Mine has only seen the ground a handful of times but it doesn't look like it's gonna take but another handful before I'll have to replace it. In the event that I a.) find the time and b.) churn a couple out, is that something anyone else would be interested in?

Definitely wouldn't be the kind of thing I'd be looking to make money on, just reimbursement for materials, shipping that kind of thing.


Let me know what you guys think and be safe out there!

-Alamo
Found out what hi speed wheelies (4th high rpm) feel like on pavement. 0/10 would not recommend jumping off the back to save the bike... even though the back brake didnt bring me down lol.
 

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Whut up alamo, ive also been trying to practice wheelies in my 05 raptor 660, ive gotten pretty good at holding the wheelie but ive noticed my raptor always veers to the right. I always have to run my left rear tire really low to even start to go straight. Is It common to have competely different rear tire pressures to wheelie straight? Is there any other way to adjust this?? Just curious because i put brand new street tires on the rappy and again im having to run the left rear at a signifigantly lower pressure difference than the right
All I have found is that you want to pull a little bit more with your left arm and it seemed to smooth out my problems, although I'm on a 2020 700 so idk if there might be a little difference in handling.
 

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Wheelies are my thing.
Your body position makes all the difference in what direction any machine goes doing wheelies.
And there is no certain position, which is why wheelies can be ridden at multiple heights and angles.
Your body is the "counter balance".
Dropping the psi in one rear tire is just a bandaid(on a 3 or 4 wheeler).
Move around on the seat more, and lean in different directions.
And, the back brake will Not help you after you pass your balance point.
Using the rear brake transfers the rotation from the rear wheels(which are now slowing or stopped)into the swingarm and frame, causing the front to drop.
I can ride a sport or dirt bike wheelie for miles, literally...but I still struggle sometimes making a 4wheeler track straight.
It's just practice, keep it up, and post pictures or video if you can!
 
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