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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know on my 07 gsxr-600 if you go with a smaller front sprocket it adds torque and bigger rear sprocket will give you more torque, are the raptors the same way?

I have a 13t front sprocket (installed) and a 14t sprocket.

For the rear sprocket I have a 38 (installed), and a 40T and a 46T. I plan on using my rappy for the dunes and for mountain/trail riding. For the dunes I am probably going to want more top speed and for trail riding I would assume more torque would be better. What sprockets would I want for dunes and what sprockets for mountain/trail riding?
 

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Smaller front/larger rear means less top speed but gives the engine more leverage (ie, torque.)

Larger front/smaller rear does the opposite.

Funnily enough, for tires it's the opposite of the rear sprocket or the same as the front sprocket. :) Confuzzled yet?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I understand what you mean with the sprockets, it's the same way with my gsxr. I am a little confused with the tired part though? When I was reading about tires a few days ago I know a lot of people were recommending a 8" tire, so I'm assuming the smaller the tire the more power then?

What sprocket setup do you guys use for dunes and for mountainl/trail riding?
 

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I know on my 07 gsxr-600 if you go with a smaller front sprocket it adds torque and bigger rear sprocket will give you more torque, are the raptors the same way?
Yes, that's the gist of it.

I understand what you mean with the sprockets, it's the same way with my gsxr. I am a little confused with the tired part though? When I was reading about tires a few days ago I know a lot of people were recommending a 8" tire, so I'm assuming the smaller the tire the more power then?
They are suggesting tires on 8" rims, not 8" tires. These are best for sand because the taller sidewall you get when using an 8" rim instead of a 9, 10 or 12 inch rim allows the tire to deform and provide more floatation. You tend to go down in gearing for the sand, especially if you are running 21 or 22" tall rubber (stock is 20").

A smaller tire has the same effect on the gear ratio as a larger rear sprocket or a smaller front sprocket. The rule of thumb used is that 1" of tire size equates to 2 teeth on a rear sprocket. So compared to a stock 20" tire with stock 14/38 gearing you would add 4 teeth to the rear sprocket with a 22" tire to maintain the same gear ratio.

What you've learned in the bike world applies, but you're going to be on a wider variety of rubber and terrain.
 
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